Thatta Kedona

Culture is a Basic Need

Toy Village

By Dr. Norbert Pintsch

The village project of the NGO A.F.A. in TGD with its Image Brand of TOY VILLAGE represents an income-generation method for the village population, which is based upon the traditional culture of the area.

The main local buyers are diplomats, experts and managers of international companies as well as tourists and other travelers.

The products are being successfully marketed within the country and even have excellent reputation in foreign countries. There are customers in USA, Canada, Japan, Australia, Nuezeland, EU und the UAE as well as collectors in ethnological Museums in Stuttgart, Cologne, Hamburg, Leipzig and Berlin.

The village NGO has in the meantime integrated members from six other villages. Furthermore, it has sub-contractors in other parts of the country through six other NGO’s from Karachi, Islamabad, Rawalpindi and Karimabad.

New products are being developed in order to integrate further women from other villages into the project.

It is very important to proceed in a particular way for such a project to be successful:
For developing new products in other villages (One Product – One Village) specially qualified staff is needed which is also ready to work together with the village population. Members of city culture may be more qualified but the preparedness to work in the village and to develop with the local residents is morec important –this point is apparently the most difficult to overcome in order to achieve success.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 11:22 AM, , links to this post

Rural Urban Migration


The process of urbanization is now more rapid and massive and affects a greater part of the world than ever before, mainly because it is now rampant in the less developed countries, which still board 3/4th of the world’s people. The migration of hundreds of millions of rural folk to cities in these still chiefly agrarian countries is revolutionizing the life of humanity just as surely as are the other major aspects of economic and social modernization. The unprecedented rates of over-all population growth are helping, along with the rural-urban migration, to swell the populations of individual cities more than ever before. Necessarily, social, economic, and political problems of major significance are being created by the huge rural-urban migration and the rapid rise of megapolises in countries whose main orientation has until recently been agricultural. Read article here.
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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 8:57 AM, , links to this post

Art of Restoration

The restoration of southern and northern parts of historical Wazir Khan Mosque has finally been completed, thanks to the generous funding by the US government.
The parts known as ‘Craft bazaar’, which originally housed calligraphers and bookbinders, are also ready to serve as a showcase of traditional arts and crafts after years of neglect. These parts of the mosque were in a state of disrepair for more than three decades; and the provincial archaeology department responsible for the maintenance did not have money for its restoration.

It was a typical case of blessing in disguise as some officials of the US embassy visited the mosque, a couple of years ago, and expressed serious concern over its decay. An amount of $49,000 under the US Ambassador's Fund for Cultural Preservation was allotted for its restoration.
According to an archaeology department official, the restoration has been carried out on the pattern it is constructed. "It has been brought to its original form," he adds. Moreover, the department maintains that it will rent out its (craft bazaar) shops to wood-workers so that they can display their artesan work.
Located in a thickly populated area of Dehli Gate, in the walled city, it is one of the two most spacious mosques in Lahore. It reflects a blend of Persian and Indian styles of architectures.

Chiniot-born Hakeem Aleemuddin Ansari, known as Nawab Wazir Khan, had laid its foundation stone in 1634 and its construction was completed in 1635. It had been built with bricks and tiles and was entirely covered with arabesque painting and lacquered tiles. The inlaid pottery decorations and panelling of the walls were vivid and glowing.


The panels of pottery were set in hard mortar and flowers, with trees and goblets decorating the exterior of the walls.The plinth level was a storey higher than the ground. The facade of the main entrance of this imposing structure from the eastern side is laid with glazed tiles, which have numerous inscriptions of the Kalima going up to the ceiling in Kashikari.


Two wells had been dug to draw fresh water to fill the pond at the centre of the courtyard. Only one of them is functioning now.

One of the striking features of the mosque is its minarets built on the four corners of the courtyard. The flour of the mosque is paved creatively with symmetrical designs made of bricks.

Text and photographs by Zulquernain Tahir
Tags: Heritage, Restoration, Pakistan

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 4:18 PM, , links to this post

Douala

Douala is the capital of Cameroon’s Littoral Province and the largest city of the country. Most people know Cameroon, by Douala, in other words it is the identity of the country. Besides that, Douala also has another significant importance in the region as it is home to Cameroon’s largest port and its major international airport “Douala Airport”. Both airport and the “port” serve as gateway to not only Cameroon but also a connecting point for neighboring countries such as central Africa, Chad, Niger and Nigeria.

In 1986, Douala became a Sister City of Philadelphia and Akhisar, Turkey mainly because it is the largest port in West Africa and the unofficial economic capital of the Cameroon. The richly diverse population that represents more than 130 ethnic groups in Douala was last estimated 1,448,300. The name “Douala” has its origin from early 17th century and it is believed that it was actually named after a tribe that settled in the coastal area of Cameroon.

Being the biggest port in the region, Douala serves as commercial capital of the country. Consequently, it handles most of the country’s major exports, such as oil, cocoa and coffee, timber, metals and fruits. This also makes Douala the richest city in the whole CEMAC region (Communauté Economique et Monetaire de l’Afrique Centrale), consisting of 11 African countries. Other countries, member of CEMAC are Central African Republic, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and Republic of Congo. On an overall basis, the CEMAC region is rich in mineral resources, with oil and gas exports accounting for almost 80 per cent of the West African region’s total exports, however, despite the abundance of natural resources, the majority of the population in the member states still lives in a below poverty line conditions. The key institutional bodies of CEMAC, such as the Conference of Heads of State, the Council of Ministers and the Bank of Central African States (BEAC) are also based in Cameroon.

For a tourist, Douala is an excellent location situated on an estuary of the River Wouri that represents a delightful mosaic of colorful markets, historic churches and museums unfolding vibrant and rich African history. Also one prominent attraction is the equatorial forest on Douala’s outskirts that serves as a sanctuary for dozens of species of birds, animals and plants. X-posted from CAT

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 11:51 AM, , links to this post

GOs and NGOs

Even if generally and in the meanwhile the term NGO has degraded into Sham-NGO, an effort is made to describe the most important functions of such an entity.

Contrary to a GO (Government Organization) and a Firm (prive or public limited company, etc.) the offices of management in an NGO are honorary positions, i.e. the president, treasurer etc. do not receive any remuneration for their work. The members of the NGO are not salaried employees, rather they work according to their own possibilities and necessities of the NGO, because contrary to the above mentioned entities, the NGO posesses neither the annual budget nor can it operate in a perspective.

An NGO should not be the extended arm of a political, religious, scientific or any other entity, thereby appearing as an institution, which is intended to be an income generating measure for its workers, because -as mentioned above-, there should supposedly be no employees in the NGO.

If this description appears to be unreal, then only because the NGO in the meanwhile is seen as a milkable cow, which is to be milked until it dries out. An NGO should also not function as a charity organization, which gives financial or material aid without the receiving party contributing anything in return. And there is also no back door (see above); - which would enable influence through the purchase of shares !

Also the tasks should be defined in such a way that, that new problem factors are not created through the work of the NGO. This means that the organization of the NGO should be horizontal in nature and it should consider its surrounding environment.

In order to achieve a certain level of independence, it is important for an NGO in urban as well as rural areas to collect and concentrate the forces at its disposal. This is in fact the basic idea of an NGO - to convert an idea into reality. Administering with charity in the foreground would actually mean that instead of being strengthened, the forces are actually being weakened through the acts of charity. International charity organizations do this for the sole purpose, because they are themselves income generating measures, - Providing help as profession is as reprehensible as providing help for image reasons !

These limitations, which reflect on how an NGO should actually be, again give rise to the question, whether there exists any institution at all, which fulfills all the classical requirements. The simple answer is: yes and one may point to AFA project in the TGD village, which is working on these principles since 1992.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 10:36 AM, , links to this post

Rural Culture

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 2:00 PM, , links to this post

Wood Work

Engraved woodwork - the name is enough to collectors, travellers and cautiously curious dreaming. Antiquity is the first message of the ancient art. And, woodwork executed in villages of Pakistan is a collector's delight that needs to be preserved.

During the Mughal era, Pakistan produced many intelligent personalities and talented artisans who occupied positions in the Mughal courts. Artisans of Pakistan have instinctive good taste and they have achieved a distinctive excellence in woodwork. They are said to have been employed during the construction of Taj Mahal at Agra and Golden Temple at Amritsar. Special types of furniture and decorative items with brightly lacquered woodcarvings and coloured woodwork are still made here and famous all over the world. Gujrat, Chaniot and Multan are particularly famous for woodwork.

What this internationally acclaimed craft of the country needs is an institutional patronization and extensive efforts for preservation. Made in Pakistan wood items are found at different antique shops and but this art seem to be fading away in the face of the factory made items. It can be a potent source of earning for village artisans if attention is paid to and earnest efforts are made. Sadly, the trained incompetents responsible for export promotion of art and culture do not see this and the unique potentials and its cultural importance yet.

posted by Omar M. Ali @ 1:31 PM, , links to this post

Traditional Economy

Traditional economy works fine even in these slow times...
The most important factors for the current development were laid in the early nineteenth century. The "rejection of thinking" and "acting as a community" -- meant for the technology -- resulted in enormous increase in the industrial production because the division of work led to higher productivity and new professions. It appeared, on the face of it, as a way to increase the standard of living and quality of life. Best example that can be cited is Taylorism as introduced in Ford automobile factories and other production units in the early industrial age.

Analysis of the society by political and economic thinkers led to development theories, which could not foresee the effects of these policies as evidenced today. The cardinal error by these theorists was the euro-centristic model -- nobody took what was happening in other cultures into consideration.

In Smith's economic system, the free market functioned globally, as long as global meant regional and maximum on a national level. In Marx's political system the democracy functioned internationally, as long as the power base was centrally located. Similar concept is also found in ancient Greek city state models on a local basis. In all the cases, there appears to be consensus on one point that multiple behavioral models (Artenvielfalt) are not acceptable in these theories. But this is precisely the decisive error.

It is in this context that the present development situation can be analyzed. Today, the market factors are democratically functioning in society, which determines the general welfare of the people. Paradoxically, the market – in the traditional sense -- neither takes into consideration the environment nor the traditional cultures that are present in rural areas. Production of goods leads to a certain uniformity because of cost reduction methods. Every effort must be undertaken, so that the production does not fall short of targets under any circumstances. The multi-national concerns attempt by adding more products to their production programs to offer a variety of models: since all parties participating in the market work in similar way, but the demand in the market is relatively fixed and not able to be increased arbitrarily, it is clear where the wastage of resources is taking place.

The winner is the one, who has the largest potential of human resources as long as these can be controlled politically. The intentions and the wishes of so-called democratic countries are understandable, if they exert all possible pressure on others to accept their form of governance. If this effort does not succeed, their system – let us call it western system -- would collapse together with all parties involved in it.

There are incredible factors, which remain unconsidered by the members of the urban culture, they being the innovators and carriers of the enormous misunderstandings and the cardinal errors. These cultures have developed over a long period of time in inter-action with the climate and the environment. Each culture has its own set of rights and should be the subject of research to shed light on this enormous richness. Of course much of the matter has been lost due to the way of thinking and the actions undertaken up till now, but exactly this is the task before us; to track down these materials.

Misuse of environment and resources are hardly a subject of discussion in economic appraisals. Similarly, the richness of traditional cultures, which still exist at least in part in the rural areas, which are typically described as "under-developed" is not mentioned in these appraisals. There is no code or value allocated to them. The damages become visible only when the values are already destroyed. The extent of destroyed traditional cultures is quite evident in the number of museums, i.e. as soon as the traditional cultures began to be considered as moneymaking measures for the institutions, they received recognition as a valid market factor, but in effect became still unstable.

As the international flow of money is not directed towards local industry and national states, there is a trend towards uniformity through optimization and standardization. This uniformity can be concealed through various designs and requires increased consumption of goods. In order to increase the consumption, the consumers (all consumers of the world united!!) require financial means, which are actually not available to the majority of population.

A special sort of market is created at the place where traditional cultures are promoted. Members of the community have a chance to participate, if they consider it a possibility to maintain their basic requirements, i.e. a form of satisfaction of most basic material needs must remain intact.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 12:49 PM, , links to this post

Dolls of the World


Proof of this is found in the excavation in South America, the Subcontinent, Japan, Italy, Greece, and other sites all over the world. Made out of sa number pof materials like wood, wax, clay, cloth etc., they were not only a toy but used also as religious symbols and cult items for example as miniaturized images of persons.

Even today they are used by many people as fetish. Today, the experts are not sure what was the first purpose of the dolls; as a toy, out of which the cult figure developed or the cult figure which became a toy.

Over and above their value as toys with educational value, dolls are realistic documentation of past and present times and therefore important source of our knowledge about the games, life, living and work conditions and economy. They are important cultural carriers.

Dr Senta Siller established different projects in Pakistan, Cameroun, Columbia, etc., in which small but long-term progress was made towards development of rural areas, help towards self-sustained development, discouragement of urbanization by way of income generating projects in the rural areas through production of certain types of handicraft items. Dolls are manufactured here lovingly and clothed in traditional dresses and accessories. Fabric design and types of clothing are revived and take an important place in daily life.

Dolls from Pakistan

The women project established by Dr Siller in 1993 in the pakistani province of Punjab, which has in the meanwhile also added a men centre, has 120 women members and it is generating income. The women here work not on full-time basis but in a traditional way so that family and field work is not compromised and festivals of different types, common in villages, can be celebrated as usual. The village Thatta Ghulamka Dhiroka has about 1200 residents. The villagers established the NGO Anjuman-e-Falah-e-Aama in 1991, which co-operates with the DGFK e.V. (German Society for Promotion of Culture). The Anjuman itself co-operates with six further projects in the country.

Dolls from Cameroun

Three co-operatives (Akwatinuighah, Akaankang, HandiCraft CAT) are functioning since 1998 in Bamenda, the capital of the North-West Provinz in Cameroun, which is located near the border to Nigeria. Also this NGO co-operates with the DGFK, Germany. Bamenda has about 60000 residents living on seven hills, who speak eight different languages. Apart from the men of CAT, over 100 women manufacture a variety of handicrafts.

Dolls from Columbia

The co-operative Tantomejor was established in 1999 in Saboya and it works in the meanwhile with three other initiatives. Saboya has about 6000 residents near Chiquinquira, the capital of Departemento Boyaca, north of Bogota. Also this NGO enjoys cooperation of the DGFK. Over 100 women are engaged in the manufacture of handicraft items.
In other languages:
Dukker Projekt
Puppen der Welt
Muñecas del Mundo
Poupées du monde
Куклы Hародов Mира

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 12:28 PM, , links to this post

Hunza Doll

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 12:15 PM, , links to this post

Twitter Rules For Girls

It's understood that trending topics on Twitter tend to cater to the lowest common denominator. Still, while we weren't necessarily surprised by what we found in the "rules for girls" hashtag, that didn't stop us from being severely disheartened. 


 # know how to walk in heels
# A good pair of shoes saves any outfit and a bad pair ruins one!
# must learn how to cook
# play dumb ; act smart !
# never fuck in the same crew. You'll be labeled as a "homie hopper".
# SHAVE everything but your head.
# I hatee when girls try too makee themselves walk bolegeted noeing dere not ! Ugh be your self plz
# value your pussy. classy > trashy
# Act like a lady, think like a man, so you dont get played like a bitch!
# if u deliberately give me an erection, plz get rid of it without complaining, its your fault! >:|
# If you look cheap and talk cheap, you get treated cheap.
# If u married wit kids, n u STILL tryna gogo dance, cant book any work cuz u round like a pumpkin, hit da gym u fat fuck
# If you don't want to be cheated on u better be a bad bitch, better show ur man ur the shit
# don't open ya legs to every nigga .... respect yourself n you'll be wifey respected" **PREACH**
# cook him food. thats the way to a guys heart.
# if u gotta man.. U better b willing to go the whole 9, b4 a brutha turn to another for sum luvin!.. Keepin it real
# don't stalk your man. Your just asking to get cheated on.
# don't try to fucc me w/o givin me head first
# fat girls wit muffin top please stop wearing those belly shirts u killing me
# Buy a shade of foundation/concealer that actually matches your skin colour.
# don't wear open toe shoes wen u got caveman feet go get a pedicure u cheap bitch
# these dishes aren't going to wash themselves
# if you don't know how to take care of your hygiene #killyourself
# If your obese, do NOT wear jeggings..no one wants to see all that glob
# don't wear skinny jeans or jegging then get made when dude look/talk/touch yo ass...
# Don't tweet about ur period. Ppl dont wanna know how heavy ur flow is, what kind of maxipad u use or when u change ur tampon
# dnt excpect to get wifed up if yu gotta "rep"
# Cook for him in stilettos
# Money isn't everything - Shopping is!
# Don't ask me not to cum in u mouth, it only makes me wanna cum on ur face. Haha
# Don't brag about who and how, your not a guy.
# At least be SOMEWHAT in shape when you're considering getting those lower-back tattoos.
# If you have more bodies than years on Earth your whore card is probably coming in the mail
# Carry lips gloss , no boy wants to kiss an ash tray
# if your Daddy wasn't there for you growing up, don't blame that shit on why you act like a hoe
# watch what niggas u hit. Cause they hit back
# don't behave like a dude!!
# If u sell pussy ur not a pimp ur a whore!!!!!!!!!!
# match your panties with your bra!
# dnt g I've a boy oral untill the space on ur finger is covered with a ring
# There is a distinction between being independent and being a bitch
# Always look glamorous no matter how bad u feel on the inside. [Via]

posted by Omar M. Ali @ 12:11 PM, , links to this post

Preservation of Cultural Heritage


The best mud house in Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka

posted by Omar M. Ali @ 12:12 PM, , links to this post

Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka

Located on the offside, between Okara und Faisalabad, 45 Minutes eastward of Harappa.

100 % EXPERIENCE OF RURAL LIFE IN THE PUNJAB,- A PROGRAMME OF ABSOLUTE CONTRASTS !


NO Swimming Pool - NO Alcohol - NO Buffet - NO Bus - N O ...!

Pre-condition for Participation: Covered skin, Respect for the traditional culture !


- Last war of freedom in the Punjab in 1857, Murder of Lord Berkeley by
the Kharel tribe of TGD
- Region of the best buffaloes of the world as well as cattle thieves;
- AFA / TGD at the EXPO 2000 in Hannover and EXPO 2005 in Aichi
- AFA / TGD silver medal for the dolls project IWSA/UNESCO 2004
- “TV-Programme”: channel ONE-sunset, channel TWO-moonshine and stars

Handicraft production of dolls in traditional dresses of provinces and minorities at the Women Centre

Models of Rickshaws and other metal toys at the Men Centre.

Best time for visits: March and October (as there is no air-conditioner in summer and no heating in winter)
Local Boarding and Lodging is available for visitors @ Pak. Rs. 250 per person per day.

Registration for Transport Lahore - Village:
M.Ilyas, AFA, Showroom Lahore, 0303-7 35 69 86

Registration for Self-Transport: Mr Farooq Ahmad, AFA, Man. Director Men Centre 0300-417 43 60
Mrs Farzana Zahoor, AFA, Man. Director Women Centre 0321-697 21 05

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 10:14 AM, , links to this post

Dolls Project

The cluster of mud and brick houses in the plains of Punjab, Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka (TGD) looks like a typical Pakistani village about 80 kilometres away from Lahore, near Gogera Sadar,  and 40 kilometres from Indus civilization ruins in Harappa. There is no gas or telephone in the village. No asphalt roads lead to it. Yet it is different, the beautiful dolls and other handicrafts made by the village folks are collectors' delight all over the world. Influencers from Indus civilization from nearby Harappa and modern techniques brought by the German volunteers can be seen in the village together.

The dolls made in the village are on display in international doll museum in Iceland, prestigious galleries and showrooms in Pakistan and abroad. TGD village doll project was one of the 767 worldwide projects presented in the "Themepark" at expo 2000 in Hannover (Germany) as an example of thinking of twenty first century. Earlier, the dolls from Pakistan participated in international toy fair in Nuremberg. These dolls show how culture goes beyond simple work of art and becomes collaboration among applied and natural sciences as well as other forces that affect our lives.

Thatta Kedona is a project, first of its kind, in rural area where handmade quality dolls and toys are crafted using all indigenous material and traditional designs based on cultural and folklore themes. The workmanship of the dolls and toys has acclaimed international recognition and clientele through their participation in numerous international events, exhibitions, fairs and display at International Doll Museum Iceland and Deutsche Gesellschafr zur Foerderung der Kultar, Germany. These toys are the embodiment of dreams, hopes and most of all self-reliance of the hands, which breathe a part of the soul into them.

How all this started? A Pakistan studying in Germany, Amjad Ali who is a native of village TGD invited his German teachers Dr. Senta Siller to visit his village back home. Dr. Senta Siller along with Dr. Norbert Pinstch came to the village where they were presented a doll made by a local woman. Dr. Senta Siller was impressed by the doll and liked the natural and simple village life. She decided to work for the village; established NGO Anjumane-e-Falah-e-Aama and started community based Woman Art Centre in TGD in 1992. The aim of this centre is to involve local womenfolk in productive, creative and healthy income generating activities. For men Dr. Norbert Pintsch established Technology Transfer and Training Centre (TTTC). This created awareness and built confidence among the village folks and they started making dolls and toys on self-help biases that are marketed all over the world. The village and its residents are benefiting in the process.

This is a holistic project. Handicraft is in the spot on the stage but the project has a cultural philosophy. Education, science, agriculture, hydrogeology (drinking water project), appropriate technology, public health, economy (marketing, distribution), tourism and communication, are all in practice.

TTTC is concentrating on improved agricultural techniques and other suitable jobs for men. Also, carpenters, blacksmiths and tailors in the village are profitably involved in production for the TTTC for men. On Dr. Norbert Pintsch's arrival in Pakistan this time (November 2007), Nation took a chance to ask him about goals, the motives and motivations.

"The goals of the project are self-help activities at a grass roots levels, holistic village development, empowerment of women, income generation, and literacy and vocational training, says Dr. Norbert Pintsch. The philosophy working behind this selfless work is "preservation of cultural heritage, reduction of migration to cities by creating additional income in the village and future is in the rural areas," he added.

Dolls from Pakistan in authentic attires of the specific tribes, communities and areas and thematic toys tempt tourists and diplomats. They collect these dolls as a souvenir of the time they spent in Pakistan. "During last seven years, the Pakistani dolls have travelled in suitcases of our client to 40 different countries. They (dolls) sit in the ambassadors' residences not only in Islamabad, but accompany them to the next and second next posting. I have met TGD dolls in the Japanese ambassador's home in Jakarta and also in the German embassy in Damascus," tells Dr. Norbert Pintsch with pride and pleasure. "Part of the artists go where ever the dolls go," says a young artist. Each doll has a small plate attached carrying the name of the doll maker.

Doll making is one of the oldest and popular folk art in Pakistan. Simple stuffed dolls are made for children particularly in rural areas where people are still striving for the attainment of basic needs. The main difference of previous doll making and the modern techniques taught by Dr. Senta is that she has introduced variety in size and shapes and dresses them in colourful costumes with attentions to details. This has resulted in high quality soft toys to cater to demands of the gift market.

Work of Dr. Norbert Pintsch and Dr. Senta Siller has not only moved the people of area but also raised a spacious and simple building for the Women Art Centre and TTTC with the help of different donors. Now there are as many as 120 women from the age of 24 to 40 working in both the centres making dolls dressed in regional (Punjabi, Sindhi, Pathan, Balochi, Kashmiri and Kalash) embroider costumes, miniatures, hand knitted shawls tin rickshaws and other toys and earning their living. They are making their own lives better and strengthening their families. "They (the women) are moving towards true equality and independence" says a doll maker who has twelve year of schooling, is married in this village and working in the Centre.

Village TGD is changing. The relative prosperity has beginning to show. Villagers are putting their children, particularly the girls in school. The Woman Art Centre is also playing a part in the well being of the villagers. The Centre has provided furniture and other equipment to the primary school in village and opened a well equipped health care centre. An annual quality of life competition is held in the village when best houses are selected in three different categories.

This seems to be one of the unique and best self help project anywhere in Pakistan.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 12:20 PM, , links to this post

Dolls of the World

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 9:19 AM, , links to this post

Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka


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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 8:55 AM, , links to this post

Mosque - New WAC Product


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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 1:52 PM, , links to this post

Wind Mill

Simple windmill is functioning in Thahhat Ghulamka Dheroka – a toy village. Work of Zephanja – a young volunteer, who was in the Village, produced this small little wonder in TTTC of AFA during his stay in the Village this summer.

This is a wonderful example of decentralized Infrastructure for people in rural areas. It can be used to produce electricity for bulbs with simple equipment and at very low costs.

Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka was the first village in Pakistan to have solar energy. Now this makes the Toy Village the first to have a Wind Milll.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 12:26 PM, , links to this post

Thatta Kedona Stall in Gymkhana Club

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 8:29 AM, , links to this post

Traditional Culture

Prof. Dr. Norbert Pintsch

The most important factors for the current development were laid in the 19th century. The rejection of thinking and acting as a community meant for the technology an enormous increase in the industrial production because the division of work led to higher productivity and new professions and it appeared on the face of it to increase the standard of living in western cultures (for example the Taylorism as introduced in Ford automobile factories)

Analysis of the society by political and economic thinkers led to development theories, which could not foresee the effects of these policies as evidenced today. The cardinal error by these theorists was the euro-centristic model, i.e. nobody took the happenings in other cultures into consideration.

In Smith's economic system, the free market functioned globally, as long as global meant regionally and maximum on a national level.

In Marx's political system the democracy functions internationally, as long as the power base is centrally located. This concept is also found in antique Greek city-state models on a local basis.

In both cases, there appears to be consensus on one point, i.e. that "multiple behavioral models (Artenvielfalt)" are not acceptable in these theories. But this is probably precisely the decisive error.

With this sketch, we would now like to analyze the present situation.

It is the market factors in a democratically functioning society, which determines the general welfare of the people.

Since the market -in the traditional sense- neither takes into consideration the environment nor the traditional cultures, which are present in rural areas and production of goods leads to certain uniformity because of cost-reduction methods. Every effort must be undertaken, so that the (B.E.P.) does not fall short of targets under any circumstances. The multi-national concerns attempt by adding more products to their production programs to offer a variety of models: since all parties participating in the market work in similar way, but the demand in the market is relatively fixed and not able to be increased arbitrarily, it is clear where the wastage of resources is taking place.

The winner is the one, who has the largest potential of human resources as long as these can be controlled politically.

The intentions and the wishes of so-called democratic countries are understandable, if they exert all possible pressure on others to accept their form of governance.

If this effort does not succeed, their system -let us call it "western system"- would collapse together with all parties involved in it.

There are incredible factors, which remain unconsidered by the members of the City-Culture, they being the innovators and carriers of the enormous misunderstandings and the cardinal errors:

a) There are very different cultures

b) These cultures have developed over a long period of time in inter-action with the climate and the environment.

c) Each culture has its own set of rights and should be the subject of research to shed light on this enormous richness.

Of course much of the matter has been lost due to the way of thinking and the actions undertaken up till now, but exactly this is the task before us; to track down these materials.

Misuse of environment and resources are hardly a subject of discussion in economic appraisals. Similarly, the richness of traditional cultures, which still exist at least in part in the rural areas, which are typically described as "under-developed" is not mentioned in these appraisals. There is no code or value allocated to them. Only when the value has been destroyed, the damage becomes visible. The extent of destroyed traditional cultures is quite evident in the number of museums, i.e. as soon as the traditional cultures began to be considered as money making measures for the institutions, they received recognition as a valid market factor, but in effect became still more unstable.

As the international flow of money is not directed towards local industry and national states, there is a trend towards uniformity through optimization and standardization. This uniformity can be concealed through various designs and requires increased consumption of goods. In order to increase the consumption, the consumers (all consumers of the world unite!!) require financial means, which are actually not available to the majority of population.

A special sort of market is created at the place where traditional cultures are promoted. Members of the community have a chance to participate, if they consider it a possibility to maintain their basic requirements, i.e. a form of satisfaction of most basic material needs must remain intact.

Author Prof Dr Norbert Pintsch, Voluntary Director, TTTC TGD can be approached here: pdp33@hotmail.com

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 7:31 AM, , links to this post

Rural Development

Prof Dr Norbert Pintsch, Omar M. Ali, Aaron Pinsker write still more on the future is in rural development

In the past, we have often discussed various opportunities of investment in rural areas. Mostly discussions at consumer and social oriented project forms showed the individuality of the regional possibilities.

Instead of an "either – or” it emerged more of a "this –as well as that" situation, although the combination may be counter-productive, if the individual characteristics of the one or the other part are not sufficiently taken into consideration.

The discussion of the waveband of possibilities leads to recognition of an urban culture and a rural culture. In areas of high population and lesser access to immovable property, the residents have no other option but to continuously vary, to invest. This segment of population requires permanent income and is therefore forced to accept long-term employment in order to organize their livelihood.

The individual here can eventually juggle, in order to cover his financial requirements to some extent, multiple jobs are one other possibility, but to escape the urban system is hardly possible. It is unthinkable to create the opposite of an old saying "city air makes free", -this was said at a time, when more people lived in the villages than in the cities.

The general administrations have their own problems to overcome, which was not such a risk in a growth oriented time and appropriate tax income. The requirements and demands developed on the basis of growth economy can hardly be turned back, -privatization appears to be a logical possibility for decreasing the pressure on the households, but it fails to recognize the most general principles of economic administration in a global background. Just to mention a comment in this regard, already discussed in sufficient detail at other platforms: foreign corporations cannot invest out of social considerations of responsibility, -a well known fact, which does not interest the short-term thinking politicians.

Should we start to consider the individual and the costs of general administration, which are needed to organize the city life, we cannot but come to the conclusion that urban life in all respects is expensive and problem growth-oriented.

The city culture is international, just as also its problems. One is forced to stand in competition with each other; this leads not to a solution of the problem but to more and more brutal competition, the results being changeable and more uniform. So the main principle is Hope and –in the absence of other possibilities- the affected masses are forced to live on hope only.

The problem of de-population of rural areas is in-fact caused by the city culture itself; the financially stronger segment can enjoy the solitude of their expensive penthouses, what however leads to other problems already discussed at other place.

People living in rural areas, they feel the taste of backwardness, -backwardness as seen by the city dweller, who cannot judge the real situation in rural background and sees it –if at all- only in romantic context. The rural life functions in a different way as compared to the urban way, a fact which may not be not be appreciated by the politicians, because only universally applicable methods appear to be logical, which are however a basis for further problems, mostly of financial nature.

To keep a clear mind here is not impossible: still there is –let us call it-"traditional culture" prevalent in rural areas, which remains unconsidered in economic terms because their evaluation, similar to the fifties of the 20th century, is quite difficult. We are today aware of the traditional culture only sub-consciously in museum and amusement. The real traditional values are thereby increasingly being lost. Such thinking is often discarded as being obsolete, -a result of stagnation. Whereby it is exactly this thinking which should be the basis for a discussion about "Future in rural development”

Infrastructure measures in the rural areas are cost provoking only then, when these are taken from the position of the city culture. It is important in the rural areas –and with that we touch the main principles of development, to support the traditional handicraft, to make it independent of the central infrastructure and also to utilize fully the possibilities of small scale technologies.

The principles mentioned here are valid for rural areas but also for areas where the industrialization has still not fully established itself, for example. in the so-called developing countries, which after an exacter inspection and discounting the pressures of industrial standards and gross domestic product and due consideration of the value of traditional culture are actually not so poor after all!

In the times of mass production, the transfer of production to so-called cheap-labour-countries etc., an individualization of the products, i.e. production according to individual requirements is becoming more and more evident. The markets are saturated after local demand is satisfied. But the principle of industrial production is actually not production according to individual needs! If one looks at the forms of individualization in the automobile industry, the practice corresponds to designing of a single family house with the means of industrial production.

We have tried to emphasize, that when the above mentioned principles are kept in mind, the future lies in the rural areas. Up till now, the cost of livelihood in rural areas is quite cheap: a simple household and the possibility of self-subsistence in many ways are quite clear. On the other side we see the advocates of city culture and the growth-oriented strategists, the insufficient infra-structure, missing workplaces, bad education facilities and many more co-criteria.

The effects of developments in the 19th century on western societies were serious and led to the well known east-west conflicts. Even if the supposed winners of this conflict continue to follow their line, it should still be pointed out, that times have changed considerably. Unfortunately this fact is not given due consideration by decision-makers and their sub-ordinates. So we should not be surprised if the population continues to think according to old patterns and continues to energetically participate, in order just to survive. Notable is, that the solutions for bringing changes, not for reforms, lie on the floor like pearls, ready to be picked up, which unfortunately should be a difficult task for a well trained and well-fed body not so keen on change.

Where can we find the traditional culture of the past? How can we make ourselves independent of the central infra-structure? What do Small-Technologies mean?

These and many other questions arise and they are not produced in pre-arranged form as mass goods, -this is strenuous, but also a challenge. The answers lie like pearls on the floor: unheeded results of ethnologists, models for appropriate technologies, new forms of employment, etc. It is interesting to note that even from USA, the land of unlimited possibilities, interesting theories have emerged, which are gladly seen as necessary and already delayed reforms to the western system, but are useful to much further extent.

Finally, since we have become accustomed to quote and give references, otherwise we are not believed, so we name Th. Kuhn (The Structure of Scientific Revolution), F.Bergmann (New Work). A. Gebhardt in Aachen looks forward to the period of individual manufacturing, of Recycelns, of three-dimensional printing, including developing and designing on a high-tech-level, -all challenges, new possibilities of rural development.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 11:46 AM, , links to this post

Thatta Kedona: Pakistan Village of Doll Makers


Thatta Kedona: The Toy Village of Pakistan documentary was released in in the movie theatre situated in the Centre of Berlin, Germany. All the active volunteers from 2004 were present to see the three hours documentary.

Joachim Polzer writes, "Dolls and tin toys reflecting regional cultures of Pakistan are products which generate cash income for the farming families through the local cooperative-like NGO. Volunteers from Western countries are also having fun by working creatively in a remote village of Islamic society with strong overlays by the traditional culture of Indus Valley (Harappa 3.000 B.C.), the Mogul period, influences from the colonial British-India period and the Punjab country culture. Hence the playfulness of a "toy village" is on both sides: for the villagers by manufacturing hand-craft toys for cash in a not-yet industrialized region avoiding rural exodus to the big cites (poverty slums that are generated in cities by migration). And on the other side one can notice the joy of Western volunteers being confronted at work by their own history framework but in present time and with a very foreign and sometimes strange context."

posted by Omar M. Ali @ 11:00 AM, , links to this post

Doll Project – Network

AeFeA - Anjuman-e-Falah-e-Aama, NGO that started in small Punjab village TGD is now working in cooperation with other NGOs in the country at different levels. Women from other villages and towns (Village Wan, Village Drie, Village Chak 31, Gogera and Okara) are also coming for training in Vocational Training Center being run by AeFeA.

AeFeA is working with the Needlework (Karimabad), Sozan (Peshawar), Behbud (Islamabad), Better Tomorrow Welfare (Rawalpindi) and Al Falah, APWA and Marie Adelaide Leprosy Centre (Karachi) at two levels – selling as well as production. At level one AeFeA sells products of other NGOs at different bazaars and expositions and the money goes back to the parent NGO and at level two AeFeA gets different item used in dolls and toys made by other NGOs.This network has also extended beyond borders.

AeFeA is working with similar NGOs in Cameroon (since 1998), Colombia (1999), Iceland (2000), UAE-Dubai (2001), Greece (2003) and in Germany (since 1995).

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 3:54 PM, , links to this post

Visit to India

Dr. Senta Sillr and Dr. Norbert Pintsch were on two days visit to Amritsr, India (Sep 22-23, 2006) to explore special material for the Dolls of the World Project. In Amratsar, both the senior experts visited Khalsa College that “looks like Atchison College Lahore,” says Dr. Norbert.

They stayed at Bhandari’s Guest House – one of the three wonders in Amratsar. From the outside Gust House gives a look of Functionalism (architectural style famous in Europe in 1920s) and from inside it is Art Deco.
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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 6:59 PM, , links to this post

Greenland Dolls Project

The idea for the project originated in the year 2002 and is based on the location of the west to east greenland. At first there were various contacts between Narsalik and Qaqortoq and in 2006 a meeting with the director of the group in greenland was held. The meeting took place in the south of the island.

The pre-conditions for the project were good due to the parallels in the locations as well as the income generating factors sheep breeding and tourism.

After the activities came to a standstill and difficulties regarding deadlines and financing emerged but also as first orders for the Inuit-Dolls were received, the project was revived by arranging the finance and a visit to Kulusuk was undertaken in September 2007.

Complete manufacturing of the Inuit-Dolls is also not feasible here as the manufacturing of the naked doll would be too expensive here. For this purpose the doll bodies from Pakistan are used here. However, the hair and skin type as well as the face form correspond to the Greenland.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 9:37 AM, , links to this post

The Project

The cluster of mud and brick houses in the plains of Punjab, Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka (TGD) looks like a typical Pakistani village about 80 kilometres away from Lahore and 40 kilometres from Indus civilization ruins in Harappa. There is no gas or telephone in the village. No asphalt roads lead to it. Yet it is different, the beautiful dolls and other handicrafts made by the village folks are collectors' delight all over the world. Influencers from Indus civilization from nearby Harappa and modern techniques brought by the German volunteers can be seen in the village together.

The dolls made in the village are on display in international doll museum in Iceland, prestigious galleries and showrooms in Pakistan and abroad. TGD village doll project was one of the 767 worldwide projects presented in the "Themepark" at expo 2000 in Hannover (Germany) as an example of thinking of twenty first century. Earlier, the dolls from Pakistan participated in international toy fair in Nuremberg. These dolls show how culture goes beyond simple work of art and becomes collaboration among applied and natural sciences as well as other forces that affect our lives.

Thatta Kedona is a project, first of its kind, in rural area where handmade quality dolls and toys are crafted using all indigenous material and traditional designs based on cultural and folklore themes. The workmanship of the dolls and toys has acclaimed international recognition and clientele through their participation in numerous international events, exhibitions, fairs and display at International Doll Museum Iceland and Deutsche Gesellschafr zur Foerderung der Kultar, Germany. These toys are the embodiment of dreams, hopes and most of all self-reliance of the hands, which breathe a part of the soul into them.

How all this started? A Pakistan studying in Germany, Amjad Ali who is a native of village TGD invited his German teachers Dr. Senta Siller to visit his village back home. Dr. Senta Siller along with Dr. Norbert Pinstch came to the village where they were presented a doll made by a local woman. Dr. Senta Siller was impressed by the doll and liked the natural and simple village life. She decided to work for the village; established NGO Anjumane-e-Falah-e-Aama and started community based Woman Art Centre in TGD in 1992. The aim of this centre is to involve local womenfolk in productive, creative and healthy income generating activities. For men Dr. Norbert Pintsch established Technology Transfer and Training Centre (TTTC). This created awareness and built confidence among the village folks and they started making dolls and toys on self-help biases that are marketed all over the world. The village and its residents are benefiting in the process.

This is a holistic project. Handicraft is in the spot on the stage but the project has a cultural philosophy. Education, science, agriculture, hydrogeology (drinking water project), appropriate technology, public health, economy (marketing, distribution), tourism and communication, are all in practice.

TTTC is concentrating on improved agricultural techniques and other suitable jobs for men. Also, carpenters, blacksmiths and tailors in the village are profitably involved in production for the TTTC for men. On Dr. Norbert Pintsch's arrival in Pakistan this time (November 2007), Nation took a chance to ask him about goals, the motives and motivations.

"The goals of the project are self-help activities at a grass roots levels, holistic village development, empowerment of women, income generation, and literacy and vocational training, says Dr. Norbert Pintsch. The philosophy working behind this selfless work is "preservation of cultural heritage, reduction of migration to cities by creating additional income in the village and future is in the rural areas," he added.

Dolls from Pakistan in authentic attires of the specific tribes, communities and areas and thematic toys tempt tourists and diplomats. They collect these dolls as a souvenir of the time they spent in Pakistan. "During last seven years, the Pakistani dolls have travelled in suitcases of our client to 40 different countries. They (dolls) sit in the ambassadors' residences not only in Islamabad, but accompany them to the next and second next posting. I have met TGD dolls in the Japanese ambassador's home in Jakarta and also in the German embassy in Damascus," tells Dr. Norbert Pintsch with pride and pleasure. "Part of the artists go where ever the dolls go," says a young artist. Each doll has a small plate attached carrying the name of the doll maker.

Doll making is one of the oldest and popular folk art in Pakistan. Simple stuffed dolls are made for children particularly in rural areas where people are still striving for the attainment of basic needs. The main difference of previous doll making and the modern techniques taught by Dr. Senta is that she has introduced variety in size and shapes and dresses them in colourful costumes with attentions to details. This has resulted in high quality soft toys to cater to demands of the gift market.

Work of Dr. Norbert Pintsch and Dr. Senta Siller has not only moved the people of area but also raised a spacious and simple building for the Women Art Centre and TTTC with the help of different donors. Now there are as many as 120 women from the age of 24 to 40 working in both the centres making dolls dressed in regional (Punjabi, Sindhi, Pathan, Balochi, Kashmiri and Kalash) embroider costumes, miniatures, hand knitted shawls tin rickshaws and other toys and earning their living. They are making their own lives better and strengthening their families. "They (the women) are moving towards true equality and independence" says a doll maker who has twelve year of schooling, is married in this village and working in the Centre.

Village TGD is changing. The relative prosperity has beginning to show. Villagers are putting their children, particularly the girls in school. The Woman Art Centre is also playing a part in the well being of the villagers. The Centre has provided furniture and other equipment to the primary school in village and opened a well equipped health care centre. An annual quality of life competition is held in the village when best houses are selected in three different categories.

This seems to be one of the unique and best self help project anywhere in Pakistan.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 1:11 PM, , links to this post

Handicraft in Men Center of AFA from TGD


New handicraft are produced in Men Centre of AFA at TGD. Air Glider is another tiny winy toy manufactured by Zephanja from October 2007 to January 2008.




Readers of this blog remember the tin Rickshaw (toy) that is still very famous in gift market.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 12:07 PM, , links to this post

New Designs from Women Art Center

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 11:29 AM, , links to this post

This is Pakistan - Slide Show



Pakistan Slide Show
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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 11:00 AM, , links to this post

Handicraft Project

Monika Kuppler is in the Womens Centre of the AFA in TGD for the fourth time this year. She has helped in the establishment of a Ceramics Workshop, which produces doll-house crockery on the basis of traditional culture and designs with the help of the young village girls.

The NGO, which has now become part of an international NGO network, has received a Seal of Excellence for Handicraft 2007 from UNESCO for its handicraft dolls, however it is still important to develop new marketable products.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 10:05 AM, , links to this post

Students in Thatta Kedona





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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 1:30 PM, , links to this post

Renate Perner in TGD

AFA is doing wonders for the education of children in village Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka. In addition to creating academic opportunities for teachers as well as students in two government schools for girls and boys, the NGO also trains the young students in art work.




This summer, AFA arranged an education workshop in which Renate Perner – volunteer who was in the village Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka for third time – gave lessons to six girls from village school in special art.






The girls will become artists for diverse artistic work in Women Art Centre of AFA in the village TGD.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 10:33 AM, , links to this post

Travelers’ View of the Area

One of the first places I came to know after settling down is a village Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka near Okara. The unique claim of the village to international fame is the dolls and toys made by village women that are collectors delight all over the world. Dolls made in the village have travelled to International Dolls Museum in Amsterdam and also have been put on display in the "Themepark" at EXPO 2000 in Hannover (Germany) as one of the 767 worldwide projects - an example of thinking for 21st century. Earlier, the dolls participated in International Toy Fair in Nuremberg. These dolls show how culture goes beyond simple work of art and becomes collaboration among applied and natural sciences as well as other forces that affect our lives.

The murals are painted on the parameter mud walls in the village where doll collectors and people interested in sustainable development and rural heritage from different initiative groups come and stay as paying guests. The village folks still consider cooing crows as symbol of the arrival of the guests. Architectural competitions are held annually when best mud house is selected. The Chief Harappan Explorer Dr. Mark Kenoyer had the place on the jury in competition held last July. Two full time German volunteers, Dr Norbert Pintsch and Dr Senta Siller, and village people are working together to change the life and out look in this peaceful hamlet. Whenever I visited the village, I saw something new, something different, which the villagers do to make difference in a place where they belong.

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 3:30 PM, , links to this post

Dolls of the World



{Urdu Text - Click to Enlarg}

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 4:37 PM, , links to this post

Guests at Thatta Ghulamka Dheroka

Aamir Rafique (PU) and Muhammad Farooq (AeFeA)


Aamir Rafique (PU) and Muhammad Iqbal (Harrapa)

Aamir Rafique (PU) and Gwendolyn Kulick (BNU)

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 9:31 AM, , links to this post

Happy New Year from Dolls Village


As I say Happy New Year to all my friends and readers and greet the start of the next year, here is the list of articles the characterized 2010 through my blogs. These articles reveal how I will remember 2010.

I am sure some of these articles will allow you to relive the memories of the past year while some others will let you how I was right (or wrong) when I wrote them. List is long. I suggest you have a cup of Doodh Patti, sit back and while you say farewell to year 2010.

Social Media in the Attention Age
Blogging in Rage
Identity Access Management
Cyber World is Not in Safe Hands
Plagiarism, Prove it!
Chaudhry Norbert Pintsch and the Appropriate Technology
Why telecommuting trend is not picking up
Art for Allah
The Nizam Sahib, I think I know
What Are Criminals Made Of?
Changing Chitral
Pakistan blogging era
Thatta Kedona reach out
Calling Pakistan marketers and advertisers
How to make money online in Pakistan
Sanjh story
Flood and the Taliban
Pakistan Flood 2010
Pakistan economy
Harrapa
Jalal HB on Fine Art of Blogging
Mud architecture in Pakistan
Revival of Mud Architecture in the world
Summer camp in Gupis
Pakistan cricket
Changing outlook

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 10:56 PM, , links to this post

Traditional Culture

Prof. Dr. Norbert Pintsch

The most important factors for the current development were laid in the 19th century. The rejection of thinking and acting as a community meant for the technology an enormous increase in the industrial production because the division of work led to higher productivity and new professions and it appeared on the face of it to increase the standard of living in western cultures (for example the Taylorism as introduced in Ford automobile factories etc.)

Analysis of the society by political and economic thinkers led to development theories, which could not foresee the effects of these policies as evidenced today. The cardinal error by these theorists was the euro-centristic model, i.e. nobody took the happenings in other cultures into consideration.

In Smith's economic system, the free market functioned globally, as long as global meant regionally and maximum on a national level.

In Marx's political system the democracy functions internationally, as long as the power base is centrally located. This concept is also found in antique Greek city-state models on a local basis.

In both cases, there appears to be consensus on one point, i.e. that "multiple behavioral models (Artenvielfalt)" are not acceptable in these theories. But this is probably precisely the decisive error.

With this sketch, we would now like to analyze the present situation.

Present situation

It is the market factors in a democratically functioning society, which determines the general welfare of the people.

Since the market -in the traditional sense- neither takes into consideration the environment nor the traditional cultures, which are present in rural areas and production of goods leads to certain uniformity because of cost-reduction methods. Every effort must be undertaken, so that the (B.E.P.) does not fall short of targets under any circumstances. The multi-national concerns attempt by adding more products to their production programs to offer a variety of models: since all parties participating in the market work in similar way, but the demand in the market is relatively fixed and not able to be increased arbitrarily, it is clear where the wastage of resources is taking place.

The winner is the one, who has the largest potential of human resources as long as these can be controlled politically.

The intentions and the wishes of so-called democratic countries are understandable, if they exert all possible pressure on others to accept their form of governance.

If this effort does not succeed, their system -let us call it "western system"- would collapse together with all parties involved in it.

There are incredible factors, which remain unconsidered by the members of the City-Culture, they being the innovators and carriers of the enormous misunderstandings and the cardinal errors:

a) There are very different cultures

b) These cultures have developed over a long period of time in inter-action with the climate and the environment.

c) Each culture has its own set of rights and should be the subject of research to shed light on this enormous richness.

Of course much of the matter has been lost due to the way of thinking and the actions undertaken up till now, but exactly this is the task before us; to track down these materials.

Misuse of environment and resources are hardly a subject of discussion in economic appraisals. Similarly, the richness of traditional cultures, which still exist at least in part in the rural areas, which are typically described as "under-developed" is not mentioned in these appraisals. There is no code or value allocated to them. Only when the value has been destroyed, the damage becomes visible. The extent of destroyed traditional cultures is quite evident in the number of museums, i.e. as soon as the traditional cultures began to be considered as money making measures for the institutions, they received recognition as a valid market factor, but in effect became still more unstable.

As the international flow of money is not directed towards local industry and national states, there is a trend towards uniformity through optimization and standardization. This uniformity can be concealed through various designs and requires increased consumption of goods. In order to increase the consumption, the consumers (all consumers of the world unite!!) require financial means, which are actually not available to the majority of population.


Outlook

A special sort of market is created at the place where traditional cultures are promoted. Members of the community have a chance to participate, if they consider it a possibility to maintain their basic requirements, i.e. a form of satisfaction of most basic material needs must remain intact.

Prof Dr Norbert Pintsch, Voluntary Director, TTTC TGD

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posted by Omar M. Ali @ 8:03 AM, , links to this post


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